dcsimg Sage Arbor, Ph.D
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Sage Arbor Ph.D.

Investigator Page

Student Resources
  • Hyperlink list (editable, cloud based lecture notes) 
  • Youtube link channel with video tutorials.

Research Interests:

With training in computational structure prediction, molecular and cellular biology, organic chemistry, data mining, and public policy my research combines the following areas of interests & methods of investigation in an effort to maximize my contribution to scientific enlightenment.

Areas of Interest Methods
Alzheimers Conformational Search , Dynamics, Docking
HIV Library synthesis
Epigenetics Data mining
Viruses Membrane modeling
Water , Protein , Structure Binding assays
Public Policy Genetic modification

There will be ample projects available for student engagement with little need for prior training. For example, computational structural biology can be picked up in as little as a week if working on a very focused topic. Many of the tools one would learn engaging in my research prove useful in a plethora of functions after becoming a doctor. For example having been involved in data mining will help catapult a doctor into the select echelon of those that can interact with the deluge of patient data that physicians will have to deal with in the 21st Century. Imagine the relative effectiveness between two physicians, when one will incorporate a patient's genomic, epigenetic, and environmental health data while the other will not. While much of this analysis seems daunting at first, there is an early learning curve barrier, which once overcome allows for easy, routine use of such data.

Research Projects

Background

  • Ph.D. Biochemistry , Washington University 2007. 
    Thesis : Mimicking protein reverse turns with cyclic tetrapeptides - computational prediction and synthetic validation.
  • BS Chemistry, BS Biology (biochemistry concentration) , Duke University 2000.

My interests started with nanotechnology and have evolved to include biotechnology, computational biology, and public policy. While working over four years at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on improving Scanning Tunneling Micscroscopy (STM), I started to see proteins as natural nanomachines and attained my BS in chemistry and biology with a minor in biochemistry from Duke University. Following college I worked in a startup biotech helping to sequence the first human genome for the NIH, after which I went on to attain my Ph.D. in biochemistry from Washington University School of Medicine where I researched protein structure and developed rigid compounds to act as therapeutics. Proceeding my thesis work I delved into various field in industry starting as a systems biologist at Pfizer elucidating molecular pathways, drug targets, and describing clinical trial population results due to genomic variation. I then managed an organic and microbial lab at Eurofins Scientific, and most recently led the global development of a new LIMS at Pioneer Hi-Bred architecting databases and analytical tools to help with genotyping. My research aims to improve the human condition through drug design and compound repurposing while studying protein misfolding, epigenetics, HIV, cancer, and causal links found via mining datasets.

  • Ph.D. Biochemistry , Washington University 2007. 
    Thesis : Mimicking protein reverse turns with cyclic tetrapeptides - computational prediction and synthetic validation.
  • BS Chemistry, BS Biology (biochemistry concentration) , Duke University 2000.

 

Representative Publications

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